Creating the Right Climate for Employee Engagement

Published: 26 Nov 14

Engaged employees are essential to achieving your company’s bottomline. Every boss wants to see his or her team collaborate in a spirit of high morale and motivation. But there needs to be the right organisational climate for this to happen. Any changes in this climate can destabilise employee engagement so it’s necessary to conduct regular check-ups of the climate.

The study of the climate involves assessing and measuring employees’ perceptions of, and subjective responses to, the organisational environment. The climate of an organisation is therefore defined operationally as the sum of the perceptions of the individuals working in that organisation. The dimensions for an organisational climate survey include:

A) Objective

Determine if organisational climate is conducive to support and ensure the achievement of your company’s strategic thrusts.
 
B) The study of the organisational climate is measured against the following 6 factors:

1. Compliance to Procedures (or Conformity)
The feeling that there are many externally imposed constraints in your company; the degree to which employees feel that there are many rules, procedures, policies and practices to which they have to conform rather than being able to do their work as they see fit.

2. Responsibility
Employees are given personal responsibility to achieve their part of your company’s goals; the degree to which employees feel that they can make decisions and solve problems without checking with superiors each step of the way. The feeling that employees have independence of personal action and a lot of responsibility delegated to them in carrying out their jobs; the degree to which they can run their jobs on their own and feel encouraged to take some risks than play it safe constantly.

3. Standards of Excellence
The emphasis your company places on quality performance and outstanding results including the degree to which the employees feel your company is setting challenging goals for itself and communicating this goal commitment to employees. Also, the degree of pressure felt for continued improvement of personal and group performance.

4. Rewards and Recognition
The degree to which employees feel that they are being recognised and rewarded for good work and given support, rather than being criticised and punished when something goes wrong.

5. Clarity of Company Direction
The feeling among employees that things are well-organised and goals are clearly defined rather than being disorderly, confused or chaotic. Includes the degree to which superiors communicate their own goals and expectations.

6. Fellowship and Association
The feeling that friendliness is a valued norm in your company; that employees trust one another and offer support to one another. The feeling amongst employees that good relationships and esprit de corps prevail in your company.

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